According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, NHTSA, drowsy driving crashes took the lives of 846 people in 2014. Don’t contribute to the statistic for this year. Follow these guidelines to prevent drowsy driving...

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, NHTSA, drowsy driving crashes took the lives of 846 people in 2014. Don’t contribute to the statistic for this year. Follow these guidelines to prevent drowsy driving...

More than 400 people die every year in wrong-way crashes, typically caused by drunk or inattentive drivers in metropolitan areas where multiple-lane freeways with on- and off-ramps that can confuse drivers are more common. Police say that drivers should remember the following things that could save your life in case you encounter a wrong way driver...

While you can’t control what other drivers do, you do have control over your own driving habits. Practicing good defensive driving skills will help make it less likely you will be involved in a car accident. Here are some tips on how to practice good defensive driving:...

Strategies for Dealing with Road RageA survey from the AAA Foundation showed that incidences of road rage are increasing and experts are struggling to determine why. The study found that aggressive driving behavior is a factor in up to 56% of fatal accidents.

The Texas Highway Patrol has stepped up its focus on ticketing road rage perpetrators, regarding angry drivers as an accident just waiting to happen. Another AAA Foundation study examined more than 10,000 road rage incidents over the past decade and found that this behavior resulted in 218 murders and 12,610 injuries.

The study found that 37 percent of road rage incidents involved gun use, 28 percent involved other weapons and 35 percent involved using the car itself as a weapon. If you encounter road rage, experts recommend that you should:

  • Remain calm
  • Get out of the way if possible
  • Do not make eye contact with the other driver
  • Do not retaliate
  • Do not challenge the other driver
  • Ignore rude gestures
  • If possible, record the make and model of the car and the license number and inform police

The attorneys of Roberts & Roberts have the skill, experience and resources to fully investigate any serious accident or death.  If you have a question about an accident involving a serious injury or fatality, please call 800-248-6000 or contact us for a free consultation.

List of 10 Best Used Cars for TeensA 2015 study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) listed the 10 best used cars for teen drivers for parents looking for safe, affordable used vehicles for their teen driver. According to the IIHS, 35 percent of fatalities for teen drivers between the ages of 16-19 are related to the types of vehicles they drive.

Selections were made based on vehicles that earned top ratings in IIHS crash tests, cost less than $20,000 and are inexpensive to maintain and insure. Here’s the list:

  1. Toyota Tundra (2007+)
  2. Jeep Cherokee (2014+)
  3. Kia Sorrento (2011+)
  4. Mazda CX-5 (2013+)
  5. Mitsubishi Outlander Sport (2011+)
  6. Honda Accord (2012+)
  7. Chevrolet Malibu (2010+)
  8. Volvo XC90 (2005+)
  9. Ford Explorer (2011+)
  10. Subaru Forester (2009+)

Parents may be surprised to see so many SUVs on the list, since it had been thought that higher profile vehicles were unsafe. However, according to the IIHS, these are the important things to know about buying your teen a safe car:

  • Larger, heavier vehicles are safer. The IIHS says parents should not consider small cars or minicars for teens.
  • Avoid vehicles with high horsepower. Many teens won’t be able to resist testing the limits of speed that vehicles with big engines provide. Their inexperience can lead to a deadly crash.
  • Electronic stability control is critical. Mandatory on vehicles since 2012, this technology helps drivers maintain control on slippery roads and curves.

If you or someone you love has been injured as a result of an accident, our Texas personal injury attorneys have the experience and resources to help you through this difficult time and obtain just compensation for your injuries. Please call 800-248-6000 or contact us for a free consultation.

Warning: If You Have a New Car, The Spare Tire May Not Be ThereIn an attempt to meet new regulatory standards for fuel efficiency, U.S. automakers have been quietly eliminating an important piece of safety equipment in new model cars: the spare tire. Unfortunately, most drivers won’t know it until they need it.

Most car manufacturers now offer spare tires as an option, with prices ranging from $100 for basic models to more than $350 for pricier cars. GM said that the requirement to add low tire pressure warning sensors in all models manufactured after 2006 has significantly reduced the risk of drivers being stranded by a flat tire, as has the prevalence of outfitting new cars with “run flat” tires.

Whether your car has a spare tire or not, following these safety tips for maintaining tires gives you a better chance of never needing it:

  • Check and adjust tire pressures monthly
  • Inspect tires monthly for signs of abnormal wear
  • Rotate tires every 6,000 miles or according to owner’s manual
  • Make sure tires are properly balanced
  • Make sure steering and suspension is in proper alignment
  • Never overload tires
  • Avoid overheating tires
  • Replace tires as needed
  • Select the right tires for your vehicle and driving environment
  • Install tires in complete sets or matched side-to-side pairs

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury, the experienced personal injury legal team at Roberts & Roberts is here to help with compassionate, aggressive representation. Please call 800-248-6000 or contact us for a free consultation.

Teen Drivers: Fatal Crash Risk Increases With Number of PassengersA report from The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety found that the possibility of teen drivers dying in a crash increases with each additional teen passenger in the car.

The report found that the risk of teen drivers dying in a crash:

  • Increased by an estimated 44 percent when one passenger under the age of 21 is in the vehicle.
  • Doubled if two people under the age of 21 are in the vehicle.
  • Quadrupled if three or more people under the age of 21 are in the vehicle.

Conversely, the study found that having an adult passenger over the age of 35 in the car with a teen driver resulted in nearly a 60 percent reduction in the risk of being involved in a fatal crash. According to the report, “Parents clearly can play a major role in protecting their teenagers by riding with their teens, even after licensure, to continue to support the development of safe driving habits.”

While teens are only 4% of the driving population, they are involved in 9% of all fatal crashes. In fact, motor vehicle crashes remain the #1 cause of death for teens; approximately three teens are killed in traffic crashes every day, and another 404 are injured.

In addition, more than half of all fatal teen accidents are one-car crashes, and the main factor in one-car crashes is excessive speed. Driving too fast coupled with inexperienced teen drivers’ tendency to misjudge a curve or bump in the road results in thousands of fatal accidents every year.

The attorneys of Roberts & Roberts have the skill, experience and resources to fully investigate any serious accident or death.  If you have a question about an accident involving a serious injury or fatality, please call 800-248-6000 or contact us for a free consultation.

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